The Road to Wanting review ↠ 103

summary ✓ eBook or Kindle ePUB ¹ Wendy Law-Yone

summary ✓ eBook or Kindle ePUB ¹ Wendy Law-Yone T for how long can Na Ga belong nowhere and with no one In the dingy hotel in Wanting she is forced to confront her compulsion to keep running and to ask herself why until now she's resisted the journey homeLonglisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction. This was a fairly disappointing read I was unsure about why Na Ga was actually going back to Burma It didn't seem her decision instead it was Will's and what was he afterRead my full wwwourbookclubnetau review at

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The Road to Wanting review ↠ 103 ô ❮Ebook❯ ➭ The Road to Wanting ➮ Author Wendy Law-Yone – Insolpro.co.uk Sometimes the hardest journey is the road homeNa Ga was always in search of a better life But now she sits alone in a hotel room in Wanting a godforsaken town on the Chinese Burmese border Plucked fro Sometim Sometimes the hardest journey is the road homeNa Ga was always in search of a better life But now she sits alone in a hotel room in Wanting a godforsaken town on the Chinese Burmese border Plucked from her wild life as a rural eel catcher Na Ga is the. Wanting a frontier town lying between China and BurmaIn a hotel room Na Ga considers how she got there and where she might go nextShe tears cloth to make a rope Maybe to escape or maybe to hang herselfBut she is interrupted by the news that the man who was to guide her over the border has chosen to end his life A compelling openingThe Road to Wanting is not a happy book not an easy book but it is powerful often beautiful and took me into a world that I knew nothing aboutThe narrative moves back and forth in town slowly building a picture of Na Ga’s life It took time and concentration to put the story together but in time I didShe grew up in a countryside community but her parents sold her into slaveryAn American family saved her and became a companion to their young daughter But she was left behind left to fend for herself when the political situation became unstableIt was then that Na Ga was tricked She found herself a slave again in a brothel in Thailand She was rescued again by another American Will He protected Na Ga for a long time but eventually his home in America would call him back and Na Ga would be left behind He left her money and a guide to steer her home Na ga wanted to go homeBut it wasn’t that easy Years of conflict had changed Burma Boundaries had moved villages had been destroyed tribes wiped out “I want to go home” I said still sitting where I had fallen I wanted to be back in my own village among the animals I knew and the cousins I played with in the dirt yard behind the thorn hedges of our village gates Where was home Should Na Ga cross the border and take her chances or should she stay in WantingIt took time to put things together but I’m glad that I did The prose was rich and evocative lyrical and still very very readable It drew me right to Na Ga’s life I saw the sights I heard the sounds I was shocked I was fascinated and I was movedIt helped that Na Ga’s first person narrative was clear and direct and it hooked me from the first page At first I thought she was passive and yes she was but I began to realise that she had never had the luxury of choice that the course of her life had always been determined by other people that she was doing what she had to to surviveThat made is difficult for me to engage with her but it also allowed me to stand back and look at her life and her situationShe had survived she had accepted and that said so much about her spirit her characterI closed The Road to Wanting thinking hard and hoping against hope for Na Ga and her countryI’m very pleased that this book was longlisted for the Orange Prize and I’d be than happy to see it on the shortlist

Wendy Law-Yone ¹ 3 review

The Road to WantingN abandoned by her would be rescuers in Rangoon Later as a teenager she finds herself chasing the dream of a new life in Thailand where further betrayals and violations await Yet The Road Kindle it seems that her fighting spirit will not be brokenBu. This is my first pick from the Orange Prize Long List 2011 The Road to Wanting is Wendy Law Yone’s third novel but my first experience of a novel set in South Eastern Asia in this case Burma and ThailandThe “Wanting” of the title is a town on the ChineseBurmese border where we first encounter our narrator Naga a young Burmese girl whose life up until now has been a mixture of poverty abuse and neglect Jiang the man who is to ensure her safe passage over the border to Burma has just killed himself and Naga also contemplates suicide as she sits in a hotel room in a limbo like situation awaiting her fate The first person narrative reveals a litany of trials and tribulations which have beleaguered Naga from an early age – as a child her parents sold her into slavery Later she is “rescued” by an American family living in Rangoon and she leads a relatively comfortable existence as friendplaymate for their daughter However happiness is always in short supply as the family abandon her when the political situation becomes unstable Naga finds herself tricked into prostitution in a brothel in Thailand and is later “rescued” again by another American Will who will in turn abandon her when the novelty wears off Thus Naga finds herself at this turning point in her life facing the possibility of returning to a homeland which probably doesn’t exist any In the tradition of her tribe the Wild Lu each child had a “name seed” to which their real name was entrusted but Naga never discovers her real name mirroring the fact that she is displaced not really belonging anywhere or to anyoneI loved the way the author captures the sights sounds and smells of Burma and Thailand the traditions of Naga’s tribe the Wild Lu apparently non existent but she convinced me the seediness of Bangkok the chasm between the rich and the poor Surprisingly there is also humour in the midst of all the tragedy This is a very readable novel lyrical and a very uiet read which somehow reflects the calm stoic nature of our narrator Naga She’s been passed from pillar to post and so dehumanised always wanting to please and serve so that she’s never really had the opportunity to be her own personThe Road to Wanting is a beautifully written intelligent account of a lost girl at a crossroads in her life; its at times matter of fact tone belies a poignancy which deeply affects the reader and you’re left with the hope that Naga will eventually achieve the happiness she so richly deserves